GUIminer Mining Guide and Others Ways to Mine Bitcoin in 2019

New people please read this. [upvote for visibility please]

I am seeing too many new people come and and getting confused. Litecoin wiki isn't the greatest when it comes to summing up things so I will try to do things as best as I can. I will attempt to explain from what I have learned and answer some questions. Hopefully people smarter than me will also chime in. I will keep this post updated as much as I can.
Preface
Litecoin is a type to electronic currency. It is just like Bitcoin but it there are differences. Difference explained here.
If you are starting to mine now chances are that you have missed the Bitcoin mining train. If you really want your time and processing power to not go to waste you should mine LTC because the access to BTC from there is much easier.
Mining. What is it?
Let's get this straight. When making any financial commitment to this be prepared to do it with "throw away" money. Mining is all about the hashrate and is measured in KH/s (KiloHash/sec). Unlike the powerful ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) that are used to mine bitcoins using hashrates in the GH/s and even TH/s, litecoin mining has only been able to achieve at the very best MH/s. I think the highest I've seen is 130 MH/s so far. Which leads us to our next section.
Mining Hardware
While CPU mining is still a thing it is not as powerful as GPU mining. Your laptop might be able to get 1 a month. However, I encourage you to consult this list first. List of hardware comparison You will find the highest of processors can maybe pull 100 KH/s and if we put this into a litecoin mining calculator it doesn't give us much.
Another reason why you don't want to mine with your CPU is pretty simple. You are going to destroy it.
So this leaves us with GPUs. Over the past few months (and years) the HD 7950 has been the favourite because it drains less power and has a pretty good hashrate. But recently the introduction of the R9 290 (not the x) has changed the game a bit. People are getting 850 KH/s - 900 KH/s with that card. It's crazy.
Should I mine?
Honestly given the current difficulty you can make a solid rig for about $1100 with a hashrate of 1700 KH/s which would give you your investment back in about a month and a half. I am sure people out there can create something for much cheaper. Here is a good example of a setup as suggested by dystopiats
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks
Type Item Price
CPU AMD Sempron 145 2.8GHz Single-Core Processor $36.01 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock 970 EXTREME4 ATX AM3+ Motherboard $99.48 @ OutletPC
Memory Crucial Ballistix Tactical Tracer 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory $59.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (3-Way CrossFire) $245.38 @ Newegg
Video Card Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (3-Way CrossFire) $245.38 @ Newegg
Video Card Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (3-Way CrossFire) $245.38 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic Platinum 860W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $146.98 @ SuperBiiz
Total
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available. $1078.60
Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-11-29 00:52 EST-0500
Estimated Hashrate (with GPU overclocking) : 1900 KH/s
Hardware Fundamentals
CPU - Do you need a powerful CPU? No but make sure it is a decent one. AMD CPUs are cheap to buy right now with tons of power. Feel free to use a Sempron or Celeron depending on what Motherboard you go with.
RAM - Try to get at least 4 GB so as to not run into any trouble. Memory is cheap these days. I am saying 4 GB only because of Windoze. If you are plan to run this on Linux you can even get away with less memory.
HDD Any good ol 7200 RPM hard drive will do. Make sure it is appropriate. No point in buying a 1TB hard drive. Since, this is a newbie's guide I assumed most won't know how to run linux, but incase you do you can get a USB flash drive and run linux from it thus removing the need for hard drive all toghether. (thanks dystopiats)
GPU - Consult the list of hardware of hardware I posted above. Make sure you consider the KH/s/W ratio. To me the 290 is the best option but you can skimp down to 7950 if you like.
PSU - THIS IS BLOODY IMPORTANT. Most modern GPUs are power hungry so please make sure you are well within the limits of your power consumption.
MOTHERBOARD - Ok, so a pretty popular board right now is Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3 and the ASRock 970 Extreme4. Some people are even going for Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD5 and even the mighty Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD7 because it has more PCI-E slots. 6 to be exact. However you may not need that much. With risers you can get more shoved into less.
PCI-E RISERS - These are called risers. They come in x16 to x16 and x1 to x16 connections. Here is the general rule of thumb. This is very important. Always get a POWERED riser otherwise you will burn a hole in your MoBo. A powered rise as a molex connector so that additional power from PSU can be supplied.
When it comes to hardware I've provided the most basic knowledge you need. Also, take a look at cryptobader's website. This is very helpful. Please visit the mining section of Litecoin Forums and the litecoinmining subreddit for more indepth info.
Mining Software
Now that you have assembled your hardware now you need to get into a pool. But before you do that you need a mining software. There are many different ones but the one that is most popular is cgminer. Download it and make sure you read the README. It is a very robust piece of software. Please read this if you want to know more. (thanks BalzOnYer4Head)
Mining Pools
Now that your hardware and software is ready. I know nothing about solo mining other than the fact that you have to be very lucky and respectable amount of hashing power to decrypt a block. So it is better to join pools. I have been pool hopping for a bit and really liked give-me-coin previously known to the community as give-me-ltc. They have a nice mobile app and 0% pool fees. This is really a personal preference. Take a look at this list and try some yourself.
How do I connect to a pool?
Most pools will give you a tutorial on how to but the basics are as follows:
  • Signup for a pool
  • Create a worker for your account. Usually one worker per rig (Yes people have multiple rigs) is generally a good idea.
  • Create a .run file. Open up notepad and type cgminer.exe -o (address_to_the_miningpool:port_number) -u (yourusername.workername) -p (your_worker_password_if_you_made_one). Then File>Save As>runcgminer.run (Make sure the drop down is set to "All Files" and .txt document.) and save in the same folder as cgminer. That's it.
  • Double click on runcgminer.run (or whatever you named it) and have fun mining.
Mining Profitability
This game is not easy. If it was, practically everyone would be doing it. This is strictly a numbers game and there are calculations available that can help you determine your risk on your investments. 4 variables you need to consider when you are starting to mine:
Hardware cost: The cost of your physical hardware to run this whole operation.
Power: Measured in $/KwH is also known as the operating cost.
Difficulty rate: To put it in layman's terms the increase in difficulty is inversely proportional to amount of coin you can mine. The harder the difficulty the harder it is to mine coin. Right now difficulty is rising at about 18% per 3 days. This can and will change since all you miners are soon going to jump on the band wagon.
Your sanity: I am not going to tell you to keep calm and chive on because quiet frankly that is stupid. What I will tell you not to get too carried away. You will pull you hair out. Seriously.
Next thing you will need is a simple tool. A mining profitability calculator. I have two favourite ones.
coinwarz
I like this one cause it is simple. The fields are self explanatory. Try it.
bitcoinwisdom
I like this one because it is a more real life scenario calculator and more complicated one (not really). It also takes increasing difficulty into account.
Please note: This is the absolute basic info you need. If you have more questions feel free to ask and or google it!
More Below.
submitted by craeyon to litecoin [link] [comments]

Raspberry Pi + ASIC defcoin mining guide

Want to get started mining defcoin with an ASIC and a Raspberry Pi? Does 360 KH/s of mining power sound appealing? Here’s how to do it.
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Blpj8IvCcAEIStY.jpg
1) Hardware List
-Raspberry Pi Model B
--SD Card
--Micro USB power supply
--Ethernet cable
-Gridseed ASIC
--12V power supply (5.5mm/2.5mm barrel connector)
--USB to Mini USB data cable
The main component is the Gridseed ASIC, which will be doing the Scrypt calculations. The Raspberry Pi will be used as the controller for the ASIC, and will be doing the communication with the mining pool. If you’re not familiar with the term, an ASIC is an Application-Specific Integrated Circuit - basically a chip with a single purpose, like mining crypto currency. Using an ASIC will allow us to mine more efficiently than we would be able to with general purpose hardware.
The ASIC that I’m using is a “300+ KH/s Single Gridseed ASIC Miner”. It looks like a CPU heatsink with a fan attached. There is actually a circuit board with 5 ASIC chips sandwiched between two halves of this heatsink, and has a mini USB connector and a power connector sticking out the side. There are a few places where you can buy these. I bought mine at GAWMiners.com for $130. That was the lowest price that I could find, and I had a good experience buying from them. Use this link, and you can get $20 off of a $200 order (and give me some referral points :-)) GAWMiners. You can also find other vendors by searching for “Gridseed ASIC”. You’ll need a 12V power supply to power the ASIC, and a USB A to USB Mini B cable to connect the ASIC to the Raspberry Pi. I’m using a 60W power supply, which seems to be working fine for defcoin (Scrypt) mining. These ASICs can also mine Bitcoin at the same time, but you may need a beefier power supply if you want to do that.
The Raspberry Pi can be purchased at any number of places- Amazon, SparkFun, AdaFruit, etc. I’m using the Model B because I had one already, and also because it has a built in ethernet port that will make connecting to the internet easy. Make sure to get an SD Card and a micro USB power adapter to get the Pi up and running too.
2) Software
If you haven’t already, download the defcoin wallet from defcoin.org. If you want to do pooled mining, create an account for one of the defcoin pools, such as redbaron.us or whichever other pool you want to mine. Once you’ve created a pool account, make sure to create a worker too (for MPOS pools, that will be under My Account > My Workers). The password for your worker does not have to be the same as the password for your pool account (and it probably shouldn’t be).
Next, download the latest Raspbian image from raspberrypi.org/downloads/ and install the image to your SD card. Instructions for installing the image can be found here. If you are using the dd method on a Mac, make sure to use /dev/rdiskX instead of /dev/diskX - both will work, but rdiskX is much faster. Once you have the image installed, put the SD card in the Raspberry Pi, connect the Pi to your network, and connect the Pi to your micro USB power adapter to power it on. Next, SSH in to your Raspberry Pi with the default username and password pi/raspberry. I use nMap to find the IP address that has been assigned to my Pi. You can also use an HDMI display and a USB keyboard to log in instead of using SSH. After logging in for the first time, run through the wizard that comes up to configure your Raspberry Pi. The defaults are fine for most things, just make sure that you don’t skip the step to expand the filesystem to use the rest of your SD card. If you don’t expand the filesystem, there won’t be enough space for other software.
Once you have Raspbian installed, and have gotten through all of the first login setup stuff (which will likely end with a reboot), log back in to the Raspberry Pi with the pi user. From the command line, run sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
There are some stability issues with USB communication between the Raspberry Pi and the Gridseed ASIC. Enabling SLUB debugging seems to resolve this, at least well enough to prevent the Raspberry Pi from freezing every so often. Open the /boot/cmdline.txt file, and add the following text to the end of the line. Don’t add a new line, just add this to the end. You can use vi, nano, or whatever your favorite text editor is to do this.
slub_debug=FP 
Reboot the Raspberry Pi once you’ve added that flag to your /boot/cmdline.txt file.
sudo shutdown -r now 
Log back in with the pi user once the Raspberry Pi is finished rebooting.
The mining software that we’re going to use is a customized version of cgminer that has support for the Gridseed GC3355 chips that are used in our ASIC. There are a number of different mining programs out there, this is just what has been working the best for me so far. First, install git and dependencies needed to compile cgminer.
sudo apt-get install git build-essential libtool libcurl4-openssl-dev libncurses5-dev libudev-dev autoconf automake 
Next, clone the git repository for cgminer-gc3355
git clone https://github.com/dtbartle/cgminer-gc3355.git 
Next, we’ll build cgminer.
cd cgminer-gc3355 autoreconf -i ./configure --enable-scrypt --enable-gridseed make 
Once the make command finishes, we’re ready to run the mining software. You can also run make install if you want to install the software, but running it out of the build directory works just fine. Plug in the power supply for your ASIC, and connect the ASIC to it. Connect the USB cable to the ASIC and to your Raspberry Pi. Run the mining software by running the following command. The -o option specifies your pool URL, the -u option specifies your username and the workername that you set up for the pool, and the -p option is the password for your worker. There are a couple of options available that are specific to the gridseed ASICs, and those will be placed after --gridseed-options. The freq=850 option sets the clock frequency of the ASIC to 850 MHz. There are other clock options available, but 850 seems to be working best for me. I was getting hardware errors at 900, and a lower average hash rate. I am getting about 360 KH/s with the clock frequency set to 850.
sudo ./cgminer -o stratum+tcp://www.redbaron.us:3333 -u Username.Workername -p yourworkerpassword --gridseed-options freq=850 
This command needs to be run with sudo in order to access the USB hardware. You can also create another user specifically for mining, or grant the pi user the appropriate permissions if you don’t want to run cgminer as root. When you run this command, you should see output from cgminer showing that it is communicating with the mining pool, and something showing your hash rate. If you’ve gotten this far, and you’re seeing output from cgminer showing a hash rate, congratulations, you’re mining defcoins with your ASIC! There are just a couple more steps to do if you want to let your Raspberry Pi and ASIC continue mining without needing you to be logged in.
To keep cgminer running after I log out, I am using nohup. You could also use screen instead of nohup. Create a script (startMiner.sh) by running the following commands.
echo “nohup /home/pi/cgminer-gc3355/cgminer --real-quiet -o stratum+tcp://www.redbaron.us:3333 -u Username.Workername -p yourworkerpassword --gridseed-options freq=850 &” > /home/pi/startMiner.sh chmod a+x /home/pi/startMiner.sh 
If you run this command with sudo startMiner.sh, cgminer will run in the background, and will continue running after you log out. If you want to have this run when your Raspberry Pi boots, modify your /etc/rc.local script so that it executes this startMiner.sh script. Your /etc/rc.local file will end up looking like this:
# Print the IP address _IP=$(hostname -I) || true if [ "$_IP" ]; then printf "My IP address is %s\n" "$_IP" fi /home/pi/startMiner.sh exit 0 
That’s it! You should now have a Raspberry Pi controlling a defcoin mining ASIC, that starts mining as soon as it boots up. For more reading, check out some of the links below.
Gridseed GC3355 5 Chip Setup writeup on bitcointalk
cgminer-gc3355
Crypto Mining Blog
GAWMiners
raspberrypi.org
There are also some pre-built images for using a Raspberry Pi as an ASIC mining controller. I haven’t tried any of these myself, but they could be worth checking out. Raspberry Pi Controller Images with Gridseed ASIC Support
submitted by _RedBaron_ to defcoin [link] [comments]

ANTMINER S9 HOW TO SETUP COMPLETE GUIDE - YouTube tutorial: Bitcoin mining with CGMiner - YouTube How to configure cgminer - Windows mining tutorial - YouTube tutorial Bitcoin mining with CGMiner tutorial Bitcoin mining with CGMiner

Bitcoin Price Closes Above $13K for First Time Since January 2018 Driven by a Flurry of Good News . Zack Voell Oct 25, 2020. Gold. Bitcoin’s Rivalry With Gold Plus Millennial Interest Gives It ... Looking at the ever-increasing Bitcoin price and wondering how to get in on the action? One way to dip a toe in the water is to buy a cheap older-model Bitcoin miner, such as the Bitmain Antminer U3. These run around $100 on eBay currently and are a proper ASIC-based Bitcoin miner with very low power consumption. It connects to your computer via USB, and requires software like cgminer to ... Bitcoin mining software monitors this input and output of your miner while also displaying statistics such as the speed of your miner, hashrate, fa. trending; How To Setup Cgminer For Bitcoin Bitcoin . How To Setup Cgminer For Bitcoin . Dec 17, 2017 DTN Staff. twitter. pinterest. google plus. facebook. 11 Best Bitcoin Mining Software For Mac, Windows, Linux ... Solo.ckpool - Bitcoin Wiki. This article is about the solo mining pool. For other uses, see Ckpool (disambiguation) . solo.ckpool.org is a solo mining pool implementation without the need to setup a local bitcoind. solo.ckpool was started on the 31. If you have Bitmain AntMiner U1 USB sticks for Bitcoin (BTC) mining you would need to use a special version of cgminer miner software that is compiled to support these BTC ASIC devices. Below you will find cgminer 3.8.5 compiled for Windows that has support for the AntMiner U1 USB ASIC miners along with example BAT files to run the USB ASIC at “stock” frequency for 1.6 GH/s, along with ...

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ANTMINER S9 HOW TO SETUP COMPLETE GUIDE - YouTube

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